News

When you spend some time with James Carey, you realize that public service and AFSCME activism run in his blood.

The news media last week thrust state employees' contractual benefits into the spotlight following Governor Ned Lamont's public remarks at his daily COVD-19 (novel coronavirus) briefing.

The blue and yellow sign greeting staff and visitors to the Bridgeport Health Care Center nursing home reads, “Dedicated to Caring.”

Those words are profoundly true for the 200 dedicated staff who work there and are represented by AFSCME Local 1522 (Bridgeport Board of Education/BHCC).  But they are a cruel irony weighed against the monstrous greed that has forced the facility to close this spring.

“It’s a wide-awake nightmare,” said Local 1522 President Sherrie Weller. “There’s been a level of torture and torment nobody can imagine.”

Council 4 (and our national AFSCME union) offer a wealth of free training and education opportunities, both in-person and online.

In 2020, Council 4 is launching "Saturday Study Hall" trainings at our office in New Britain.  We've scheduled classes on a wide range of subject matter, from grievance handling, social media and CPR/Opioid training to post-retirement planning, union treasurer responsibilities and OSHA certification.  We are also teaming up with the Connecticut AFL-CIO for a special training geared toward union members running for political office.

AFSCME members sat down with congressional lawmakers last week to share stories about how the Public Service Freedom to Negotiate Act would improve communities and empower workers.

The Connecticut General Assembly convenes Feb. 5, 2020 and adjourns May 6, 2020.

Council 4's legislative agenda reflects a commitment to advocating for laws and budgets that create good-paying jobs with benefits, promote quality public services and create healthy communities where our union members live and work.

To learn more and get involved, please contact Council 4 lobbyists Brian Anderson at [email protected] or Zak Leavy at [email protected].

It’s hard to imagine nearly 700,000 Americans going hungry, but that’s the anticipated impact of a harsh rule change imposed by the Trump administration for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

In Connecticut, Council 4 members like Bill Seedman of AFSCME Local 714 (P-2 Social & Human Services) will see the damaging ripple effect that poor nutrition has on young people and families. And they’re justifiably sounding the alarm.

Here’s a big reason to join a union – a bigger paycheck.New numbers from U.S. Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) show just how much of a difference a union makes in terms of worker pay.

AFSCME members pushed Congress hard to fund the Substance Use Disorder Treatment Workforce Loan Repayment Program, which is aimed at helping lessen the burden of crushing student loans for full-time workers who treat or support patients with substance-use disorders.

In late December, $12 million in new funding was signed into law, a big victory for AFSCME’s United We Heal campaign, which led a grassroots effort in

On a normal day, Sandra Pacheco, an administrative assistant in Puerto Rico’s Department of Transportation and Public Works, begins her day at 7 a.m., filing paperwork for her colleagues in the field. It’s a job that Pacheco, who is president of her local, AFSCME Local 3889, Council 95 (Servidores Públicos Unidos de Puerto Rico), does with pride and dedication.