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The Connecticut General Assembly convenes Feb. 5, 2020 and adjourns May 6, 2020.

It’s hard to imagine nearly 700,000 Americans going hungry, but that’s the anticipated impact of a harsh rule change imposed by the Trump administration for the Supplemental Nutrition Assista

Ask RohanTrevon Brown of AFSCME Local 714 if millennials are the future of our AFSCME union, and he’ll answer with a resounding “Yes.”

“The generation before us was taught to follow whatever you were told,” the 29-year-old Brown said. “I’ve grown up in an era where you verify, check and ask questions. Having a union provides me the means to do that.”

It’s not a secret that drug prices in the United States are rising much faster than inflation. To take but one example: between 2002 and 2013, the price of insulin, a hormone that saves millions of lives every year, more than tripled.

The “Never Quit” attitude of AFSCME members was on full display in the Town of Ellington on June 10, when the heroic actions of three Department of Public Works employees saved the life of their colleague Shawn Bull.

The day started normally for Bull, a DPW maintainer and member of AFSCME Local 1303-009, but soon veered into disaster when he lost control of his high-powered chop saw while working on a catch basin. The saw kicked back, sliced Bull’s neck open and severed his carotid artery and jugular vein.

Screenshot of wage calculator

AFSCME members have long known one big advantage of joining a union: better wages.

Denise Stevenson, a 33-year veteran of state government and a second generation union member, is not reticent about extolling the virtues of pensions.

“I think that everyone should be entitled to have a pension if you work in the United States,” she said. “A pension is not a fringe benefit. It’s a right.”

Stevenson is a Unit Supervisor for the State Department of Social Services. In addition to serving as a union steward, she is also an Executive Board member of Local 704 (NP-3 Clerical Bargaining Unit).

The birth of a baby is a blessed event, but it can be stressful, too.

Melissa Prosco of AFSCME Local 2863 (Hamden Town Employees and School Crossing Guards) experienced both ends of the spectrum when she and her husband Matthew recently welcomed their second son Aaron into the world.

Thanks to her union, Melissa and her family are in full blessing mode.

Prosco, a school crossing guard, experienced complications with her pregnancy that necessitated Caesarian section surgery and a nearly week-long hospital stay.

There’s no avoiding the reality of what’s happening to our environment. Without mitigating measures global climate change will have significant negative economic, environmental and fiscal implications for state and local governments (and the jobs they provide), as well as our communities and residents.

On Sept. 11, 2001, we as a nation faced a tragedy unique in our history. And we promised each other to never forget — never forget those who lost their lives or those who put their lives on the line to save others.