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East Lyme, CT – There are nearly 120 public school paraprofessionals in the East Lyme who touch the lives of students in countless ways and help raise their system to Blue Ribbon levels of a

Recent news reports indicate that the recently passed state budget included $450 million i

Election Day is November 6, 2018. The stakes are higher than ever.

Council 4's legislative and political action program is geared toward defending our pay, benefits and voice on the job -- all of which are under attack by the same ultra-wealthy and corporate special interests that bankrolled the Janus v. AFSCME case, in which the Supreme Court nationalized "Right To Work For Less."

Collective bargaining agreements reached in recent weeks with private sector employers for working women and men represented by Council 4 AFSCME-affiliated local unions provide a template on how to organize for power and build solidarity.

The individual contracts, impacting nearly 200 members of AFSCME Local 3145 (CT Blood Services Region of the American Red Cross) and nearly 30 members of AFSCME Local 1303-275 (Hamden School Cafeteria/Whitson’s Culinary Group), included significant gains that provide solid footing for the future.

As more Americans realize unions may be their best bet to reverse economic trends that favor the rich and powerful, the labor movement faces relentless attacks from the very forces that benefit the most from economic inequality. Shadowy front groups funded by billionaires spend millions of dollars attacking unions in the courts, in the media, and at the ballot box. 

The value of union membership has become increasingly apparent in these precarious times as working people fight the blunt impact of an economy rigged by corporate and wealthy special interests.

It was 10 years ago this month that the 2008 financial crisis kicked into high gear. When storied Wall Street bank Lehman Brothers shut down, bankers walking out of the building carrying cardboard boxes of their possessions made the perfect image for TV cameras.

No politician running for office today would openly advocate for more wealth inequality in our country, where the richest 1 percent of the population owns 40 percent of the wealth. Even candidate Donald Trump in 2016 promised to stand up for the “forgotten men and women of our country,” who feel betrayed by a rigged economic system that benefits a small minority at their expense. Yet every single day, President Trump and congressional leaders seem determined to do more to increase wealth inequality than to alleviate it; do more for corporations and the wealthy than for single parents working two or three jobs to make ends meet.