News

Election Day is almost here and COVID-19 has been a game-changer.

Are You Ready to Vote?

You have real power in this election, but you must vote to make your voice heard.

It’s easy to say that the 2020 election is the most important of our lifetimes, but hearing this firsthand from AFSCME Retirees, many of whom have dedicated their lives to public service and making America a better place to live, shows the urgency to us all.

The new year brings good news for millions of working Americans. Nearly 7 million of them are in line to get pay raises this year thanks to state and local minimum-wage hikes.

2020 is here. It's a perfect time for Council 4 members to get ahead with their education.

The AFSCME Free College Benefit makes it possible for you and your family members to earn an associate degree completely online – for FREE.

This union benefit is open to all active, dues-paying members, their spouses, children and grandchildren, as well as retired AFSCME members.

Through our national union's partnership with Eastern Gateway Community College in Ohio,  you can choose from the following degree programs:

As a public librarian for the Philadelphia Free Library, Sheila O’Steen embodies what we think of when we imagine a public service worker. Every day, she interacts with members of her community. Whether her patrons are young or old, affluent or impoverished, O’Steen shares knowledge and information with everyone she serves.

The 1965 Voting Rights Act worked. In the years and decades that followed its implementation, the law helped minority voters make their voices heard, especially African Americans who had been discriminated against at the polls. As a result, our democracy became stronger.

But in 2013, despite bipartisan reauthorization of the law by Congress, the Supreme Court gutted it, ruling 5-4 that a key provision was no longer necessary because the Voting Rights Act had worked and the problem was fixed.

Despite high levels of stress on the job, many state and local workers say they highly value serving the public and their communities and feel generally satisfied with their jobs.

This finding, from a national survey commissioned by the National Institute on Retirement Security, will not surprise many AFSCME members, who work in state, county and local governments and never quit on their communities.

AFSCME members who work in health care and social services jobs face workplace violence daily. Now they are closer to having it.

Winter brings a special set of challenges to the worklife of AFSCME Local 818 member Michael Thompson, who for the last four years has served as the Superintendent of Field Services for the New Britain Department of Public Works.

A 31-year veteran of city employment, Thompson got more added to his plate on Nov. 5, 2019, when New Britain voters elected him to serve a two-year term on the Common Council. 

Thompson, who is unaffiliated, is excited to bring his union values to New Britain politics.